by Woody Leonhard. November 11, 2011 Phuket Gazette

PHUKET: A scam email appealing for users’ bank details under the guise of helping to make a flood relief donation of one million dollars for flood victims in Bangkok is finding its way into the in-boxes of many residents in Phuket and probably around the world.

“Every disaster brings scammers, and the flooding in Thailand is no exception. We’ve seen several copies of a scamming email making the rounds,” Phuket Gazettecolumnist Woody Leonhard reported today.

Mr Leonhard gave one example of the email:

==================================================================

—–Original Message—–
From: Richard David [mailto:bnkwire @inbox.lv]
Sent: Wednesday, November 09, 2011 6:41 PM
To: info
Subject: Re: PLEASE…..REPLY…….. ASAP

Good Day,

I work with an NGO (Non Governmental Organisation). In view of the recent flood disaster in Thailand, my organisation has map out $1m (One Million Dollars) as aid to victims of the flood disaster and we are now looking to contact a reputable NGO in Thailand that can help the distribution of the fund sincerely to the affected persons. So if you know of any you can direct me to them or if you can sincerely handle the distribution of this $1m, I shall recommend you to my organisation for the fund to be sent directly to you. Please do reply me and let me know if we can rely on you for the sincere and successful distribution of the $1m.reply here richrad _ david @ yahoo.com.ph

Waiting to hear from you.

Best Regs

Richard David

==================================================================

Mr Leonhard said he had already seen several variations of the scam email in circulation.

“The email says it comes from inbox.lv. That’s a free email hosting service based in Latvia. The address at the end of the message comes from Yahoo mail in the Philippines. I don’t know of too many people in Latvia with $1 million to donate, who use free email hosts. Also note how the spelling of ‘Richard/Richrad’ changes.

“It’s strange that the scammer didn’t go to the trouble of disguising his email address. Also strange that these emails were sent to people in Phuket – who have ample opportunity to donate to legitimate flood relief organizations,” he said.

“The obvious warnings [about replying] apply. It’s a scam,” he added.

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